International Law
Programme and Papers

Abstracts and papers are available below the programme:

Programme

Session 1: September 11th 13.45 - 15.15 Room G25

1A     Russell Buchan (Sheffield),
         ‘The Continuing Relevance of Liberal International Relations Theory'
1B    Henry Jones ((Leicester),
         ‘Interrogating the Legacy: What Early Modern Political Theory Can Still Tell Us about International Law?

Session 2: September 11th 15.45 - 17.15 Room G25

2A  Bharat Malkani (Birmingham),
      ‘The Obligation on Abolitionist States to Refrain from Aiding and Assisting the Administration of the Death Penalty'
2B  Evelyne Schmid (Bangor),
       ‘The Overlap between International and Transnational Crimes and Violations of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights'
2C  Alexander Orakhelashvili (Birmingham),
       ‘Recent Developments regarding Transnational Human Rights Litigation: Implications for National Courts

Session 3 September 12th 09.00 - 10.30 Room G25

3A    Isobel Roele (Cardiff),
        ‘Disciplinary Power and the Enforcement of International Peace and Security'
3B    Zeray Yihdego (Oxford Brookes),
        ‘The UN Arms Trade Treaty Negotiations: Controversies and Prospects'
3C   Aoife O'Donoghue (Durham),
       ‘Splendid Isolation: International Humanitarian Law, Legal Theory and the International Legal Order'.

Session 4 September 12th 13.30 - 15.00 Room G25

4A    Jean d'Aspremont and Larissa van der Herik (Amsterdam),
        ‘International Legal Scholarship in the Cyberage: The New Modes of Production and Dissemination of Knowledge about International Law'
4B   Duncan French (Lincoln),
        ‘Why Do We Teach International Law Like We Do?'
4C   Adamantia Rachovitsa (Nottingham),
        ‘Lost Highways: The Urgent Need to Construct (New) Linkages in the Law'

Abstracts

‘Why Do We Teach International Law Like We Do?’ by Duncan French .
The Obligation on Abolitionist States to Refrain from Aiding and Assisting the Administration of the Death Penalty by Bharat Malkani.
Digitalized Modes of Production and Dissemination of Knowledge About International Law by Jean d’Aspremont and Larissa van den Herik.
Recent Developments regarding Transnational Human Rights Litigation: Implications for National Courts by Alexander Orakhelashvili.
Disciplinary Power and the Enforcement of International Peace and Security by Isobel Roele, Cardiff University.
The Overlap between Violations of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and International Crimes by Evelyne Schmid.

Papers

DIGITALIZED MODES OF PRODUCTION AND DISSEMINATION OF KNOWLEDGE ABOUT INTERNATIONAL LAW by Jean d’Aspremont and Larissa van den Herik.

Posters

No posters available.

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